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tv   Your World This Morning  Al Jazeera  February 12, 2016 7:00am-9:01am EST

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♪ and ambitious plan the u.s. and russia broker a deal to stop the fighter in syria. i'm not a single issue candidate and i do not believe we live in a single issue country. >> they square off for the first time since the blow off win in new hampshire. >> zika and looking for more money and mormon tearing at airports. pope francis on his way to meet the orthodox church and the first meeting between them in a thousand years. ♪
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good morning and welcome for your world, i'm del walters. >> i'm stephanie sy and no response from syria to try to end the fighting there and secretary of state john kerry and counterpart sergei fedorov reached a deal late last night. >> not take in effect until next week and may not stop the bombing in the country but the temporary plan could have a long-term end to syria civil war and provide much needed humanitarian aid. >> we are chairing the ceasefire component, the ceasefire ultimately, not at this moment but the objective is to achieve a durable, long-term ceasefire at some point in time. >> reporter: important rebel coalition welcoming the deal this morning and they say if the fighting actually stops it will go back to the negotiating table in geneva. al jazeera's jamie mcintyre is live for us at the pentagon this morning and what does this deal do and what does it not do? >> well del if you woke up in
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syria this morning you might not notice much difference and, in fact, just hours after this agreement was announced there were more russian air strikes in the area of homs, reports that more than a dozen civilians were killed during those air strikes and so one thing that is the agreement does not stop air strikes in syria for the time being and, in fact, doesn't stop u.s. air strikes either. under the agreement there is a temporary cessation of hostiles and not the same as a ceasefire beginning in a week assuming details can be worked out but would not apply to groups that are terrorist groups including i.s.i.l. and the al-nusra front and the operations in syria could continue. in fact, they are continuing today as well. the other big part of this which is supposed to go in effect immediately is the delivery of humanitarian aid to many of these besieged syrian cities
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where civilians are in desperate straits without food and medicine and basic supplies and they will start being delivered over land routes and in some cases air drop once the details can be worked out so that is the immediate impact is supposed to be the delivery of humanitarian aid and working to temporary cessation of hostilities and laying the ground work of lasting negotiations of a permanent ceasefire. >> the strategy was slammed and seriously questioned this week by several allies namely the syrian opposition that was in munich so how does that effect the u.s. role in this process? >> well, you know, the u.s. role is going to continue to be the same. they fight against i.s.i.l. and try to get this cessation of hostilities and really i mean the frustration of the groups involved is understandable because what this agreement appears to do especially because it doesn't stop any air strikes by russia for at least another
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week or so is it seems to basically solidified bashar al-assad's gains that he has been able to gain in resent months with the help of these russian air strikes, it sort of locks those in and puts the rebel groups in a serious disadvantage but the u.s. believes that they first have to get an end to the civil war and then possibly even work with russia to defeat i.s.i.l. in syria so there is a lot of frustration but really these groups have no other better ally they can turn to than the united states as they try to counter russia and the assad regime. >> before you go frustration as well as i guess skepticism because we are talking about trusting russia and we are also talking about a deal that was reached between diplomates but not necessarily the people on the ground pulling the trigger, that would be i.s.i.l. and the al-nusra front. >> so as secretary kerry said these are just words on paper.
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we have seen these before and we need to see what will happen over the next week, will the humanitarian aid be delivered, will there be a tailoring back of air strikes in areas that are simply as targeting civilian areas and will they be able to come up with this cessation of hostilities agreement in a week from now and that is not at all certain, del. >> jamie mcintyre live for us at the pentagon and thank you very much. 50,000 syrians have now fled the fighting in aleppo that is according to the red cross. and the u k-based syrian observatory for human rights says 500 people have been killed since the syrian government began offensive there on february first and we are in gaza turkey with the latest. >> reporter: many in the opposition are welcoming any deal to relieve the suffering on the ground, offensive in aleppo displaced 50,000 people according to the u.n., many of these people are living out in the open and left their homes
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with nothing and cannot survive without aid. they are also welcoming any deal to bring in aid supplies to besieged areas and a half a million people live in besieged areas and at the same time they are skeptical and don't believe this deal will really take effect on the ground because they point to the fact that over the past five years these ceasefires have been agreed on and never really implemented on the ground and have little faith in the syrian government and backer russia and believe the objective really has been to change the balance of power on the ground, to put pressure on the rebels in order for them to surrender and believe the policy of depopulating areas as well as laying siege to areas is to bring about a surrender so for them the government is more concerned with imposing its solution to the conflict and not compromising. now air strikes are continuing on the ground. the northern homs countryside
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has been a battleground for months and now the government managed to sever the supply ruths in the area and u.n. says up to 120,000 people face the risk of starvation, face the risk of disease because aid cannot enter so there is cautious optimism but this is not a formal ceasefire and still did not hear from the armed groups on the ground on their position of whaernt thether or are going to abide by it and means a freeze on the front lines and a freeze really that the government and its backers are holding on to the strategic gains they have made over the past few weeks. >> zaina reporting from southern turkey. red cross seas water supplies in aleppo cut and deliveries cutoff. another wild ride on wall street and the market finished down 250 points on thursday and overnight it fell 5% and sent the other asia markets lower and
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what is happening overseas does have an effect on the markets. >> impose risk to u.s. economic growth. >> reporter: yellen saying they are watching the global markets carefully but expect the fed will gradually raise the interest rates later this year. hillary clinton and bernie sanders in minnesota to attend a democratic fundraiser and clashed at the first debate since sanders big win in new hampshire and michael shore has the blow by bloer. >> reporter: for the second time in a week the two for president sanders and hillary clinton debated this time here in milwaukee and for the first time since the results from new hampshire came in results that had bernie sanders winning more than 20 points. these debates for the democrats have really been sort of festivals of agreement. tonight they showed a little
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disagreement. sanders and hillary clinton went head to head over healthcare reform. >> a family in the middle of the economy would pay 500 more in taxes and get a reduction in their healthcare costs of 5,000. in my view healthcare is a right of all people, not a privilege and i will fight for that. >> we both share the goal of universal healthcare coverage, before it was called o obamacare, it was called hillary care. >> reporter: took on the economy, jobs and education and at times it was contentious. >> once i'm in the white house we will have enough political capitol to do that. >> secretary clinton you are not in the white house yet. >> reporter: when foreign policy came up sanders was trying to strengthen his candidacy with less experience than his opponent who tried to stand out. >> in her book and in this last debate she talked about getting the approval or the support or the mentoring of henry
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kissinger. i happen to believe that henry kissinger was one of the most destructive secretaries of state in the modern history of this country. >> well, i know journalists have asked who you do listen to on foreign policy and we have yet to know who it is. >> well it ain't henry kissinger that is for sure. >> that is fine. >> reporter: moderator brought up the new hampshire results which showed hillary clinton struggling with women. >> i make sure women make their own choices even if that choice is not to vote for me. >> look we are fighting for every vote that we can get. >> reporter: president obama loomed over the debate as clinton aligned herself with the obama legacy throughout. >> the kind of criticism that we've heard from senator sanders about our president i expect from republicans, i do not expect from someone running for the democratic nomination to
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succeed president obama. [applause] madam secretary that is a low blow. >> reporter: a rare moment of caustic exchange as the democratic campaign may be taking on a different tone with more frequent debates and so much at stake. michael with al jazeera, milwaukee, wisconsin. on the republican side ted cruz campaign denies knowledge of ro bo calls in south carolina and they become hostile when they say they support anyone other than cruz and donald trump accused the campaign of push-pulling against him. former president george w bush plans to hit the campaign trail next week in support of his brother and will hold a rally with jeb in charleston, south carolina the 4 third president won the primary in 2000 and 2004 and jeb bush is trying to capitalize on that. al jazeera's randall pinkston
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has more. >> reporter: trailing badly in preference polls jeb bush is trying to jump start his campaign in south carolina. >> i'm sure it will turn out all right. [applause] the welcome was warm at a question-and-answer session in florence and lending a helping hand the senior united states senator lindsey graham who dropped out of the primary and endorsed bush. >> my hope for jeb is we will do well here. the bushes are highly respected and turn this into referendum of commander and chief. >> reporter: she has vote for every bush who has run in south carolina and she is not about to change. >> i like him because he is a conservative man. he is a christian and he loves america. >> reporter: after the event the former governor took a few questions. governor bush what will it take to turn it around for you? >> progress. we made good progress in new hampshire and working hard here with great crowds and we are going to work and work, that is
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the only thing i can do. i can control the things i can control, i can't control the things i can't and that sounds simple but it's how politics works. >> reporter: poll leader donald trump held a rally in south carolina calling on voters to turn their backs on all of his opponents. >> we win here we're going to run the table. if we win here after winning so big in new hampshire all of these characters are going to give it up. >> reporter: other republican candidates senator rubio and john kasich are criss-crossing. >> one of the conclusions coming out of the states the only candidate who can beat donald trump is me. >> reporter: they are gunning for him hoping the south carolina primary will slow him down enough for them to stay in the race. randall pinkston, al jazeera, columbia, south carolina. world health organization now saying it may be a matter of weeks before they know for sure
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if the zika virus is linked to microencephaly and they say plans are being made here in the u.s. now to deal with the virus. >> reporter: there have only been a few dozen cases of zika diagnosed in the u.s. but there are worries those numbers could climb in the spring and summer. >> we have the first laboratory documented case of travel-related zika in maryland. we receive calls a day from obgyn doctors. >> centers for disease control says it identified 52 zika infections in 20 u.s. states or territories since 2015. most of the cases were contracted overseas. however the c.d.c. says nine of the ten cases identified in the u.s. virgin islands and in puerto rico were acquired likely. americans should take heed of those numbers especially expe expecting mothers. >> travel advice and not to travel if you are pregnant.
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we are likely to see significant numbers of cases in puerto rico and other u.s. territories where there may be intensive spread of zika. >> reporter: the c.d.c. says because mother people infected with zika don't present symptoms the agency is not instructing border patrol agents to do special screenings and president obama asked congress for $1.8 billion to fight the virus. there appears to be support on both sides of the aisle to honor the request. >> we anticipate a reaction on this. >> reporter: a billion go to c.d.c., nearly $600 million go to hardest hit areas like puerto rico as well as overseas. only about $200 million would be for vaccine research. w.h.o. says two zika candidates appear promising but they are at least 18 months away from large-scale trials. well at least one group is aiming to beat that 18-month
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projection and brazil prime minister castro says his country has an agreement with the university of texas medical branch to work on a vaccine and he says they intend to have something ready for trial in just 12 months. >> point out the olympics are going to be held when it's cooler in brazil but you talk about no specific screenings here in the u.s. at the border, what are they going to do then? >> well, del pregnant women in the custody of u.s. immigration and customs enforcement who are from areas with high incidents of zika will be screened for the virus and special prenatal care in custody and border agents will isolate any one coming in the u.s. with symptoms and sent for treatment. we will have a disease expert coming up, in the next hour too. new york officer faces 15 years in prison after being convicted of killing an unarmed man and they found peter guilty of manslaughter and patrolling a dark stay way in 2014 when he
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was startled and fired a shot. the bullet hit 28-year-old girly and he maintained it was an accident. his lawyers plan to appeal. >> they added intentional element of the crime that was unchanged and tampering with physical evidence so clearly that could give us a very good ground for appeal. >> there are no winners here but justice was done and we want to make it clear this conviction in no way is a conviction of the new york city police department which is the finest police department in the world. >> reporter: he was dismissed from the force after the verdict was delivered. new york city mayor blasia called his death a tragedy and hopes the jury's decision will bring his family closer. secretary of state calling it lasting peace. proposed truce in syria is doomed to fail. >> south korea saying it's in talks with the u.s. as those
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tensions with north korea heat up. ♪
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there are new details this morning about that agreement to temporary halt the fighting in syria. >> russia says it doesn't mean it will stop striking groups it calls terrorist and john kerry hopes the deal can pave the way for a long-term ceasefire. >> we are doing everything in the power of diplomacy to try to bring an end to this conflict in a way that results in a unified, nonsectarian minority protecting, secular whole state. >> reporter: russian prime minister says sending ground troops into syria could result in world war. the comments are in response to saudi arabia's proposal to send soldiers to support rebels and al jazeera rory is in moscow with more. >> i think the message from the
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whole russian hierarchy really is to the united states and its regional allies namely saudi arabia in this case stay out basically, do not interfere in what is going on on the ground in syria any more than as the russians see it they are doing so already of course, the united states and various regional allies are backing different opposition groups inside syria. but i think the message he made is very clear, that would be as the russians see it a significant escalation, they say that unless the syrian government, the legitimate government as they put it are actively asking for the contribution of the ground troops in saudi arabia then and encouragement would be illegal and we do understand in the coming hours there will be a meeting in munich between sergei fedorov and the saudi arabia
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foreign minister presumably where they are going to discuss the task force that has been agreed on, this potential cessation of hostilities and of course what the saudi arabia have hinted they an about to do and sent groups in syria. >> rory reporting from moscow and want to bring in peter joining us from antigua via skype and following the peace process and met with kurds last month while you are on vacation ambassador and thank you so much for joining us on al jazeera. the target that was announced last night is a truce within a week in syria, what ideally would that look like and how much hope should syrians have that it can be implemented especially the part about immediate humanitarian aid access? >> well, ideally it would mean the fighting would stop a week from now and that there would be access for humanitarian supplies to all parts of the country
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where the ceasefire is in effect and that the supplies would go to besieged areas many which have been cutoff for months or even years from humanitarian assistance. >> how much hope do you give to this truce that was announced? >> look, this war has gone on for five years and anything that might bring an end to the fighting, even a temporary end one has to have hope so i really commend foreign minister sergei fedorov and kerry and others for having come up with in the question is whether the parties that are sponsored by the various outed si outsiders will implement the ceasefire. the outsiders have a lot of leverage so i think there is
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some reason but it really doesn't depend on russia or the united states or turkey or iran, it will depend on the syrian government and the various rebel groups that have been fighting it. >> i want to talk about u.s. policy, it has come under fire particularly in the last 48 hours from u.s. allies including the french foreign minister criticizing president obama by saying there are words but actions are different and the iranians and russians feel that, i'm assuming he is referring to these on going negotiations, is he right? >> no. i think that president obama and secretary kerry have handled this in a very careful and shrewd way. the reality is there are no forces which are capable of defeating the assad regime, providing significant numbers of weapons or support is prolonging the conflict of many of the
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people who are opposed are islamist and the end result might be as bad as the thought is it might be worse and so the only solution is going to be put the emphasis on peace talks and that is exactly what secretary kerry has done. >> thank you so much for joining us with your insights this morning. i.s.i.l. operations we should point out are not going to be affected by that pause in fighting overnight. the pentagon confirming the united emirates are sending special forces to fight the group on the ground, also in an interview with 60 minutes john brennan says i.s.i.l. now has the ability to make mustard and chlorine gas and there is evidence those weapons were used. >> there are reports that i.s.i.s. has access to chemical precursors ammunitions that they can use. i think there is always the potential for that. this is why it's so important to cutoff the various transportation routes and
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smuggling routes they have used. >> several reports says i.s.i.l. used chlorine gas in 2014 against iraqi soldiers north of baghdad and reports that a number of i.s.i.l. fighters died filling rockets with those chemicals. a meeting 1,000 years in the making. >> heads of the vatican and russian orthodox church are sitting for the first time since the 11th century. investigation in the oregon occupation and new arrests after the last protester leaves.
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>> the violence and the threat of violence is ever present. >> i deal with this every day of my life!
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>> i don't like to see people get killed. >> al jazeera america's hard-hitting. >> today, they will be arrested. >> they're firing canisters of gas at us. >> emmy award-winning investigative series. welcome back to your world this morning. [switching captioners]
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>> the sights and sounds of a russian or the l dox schism. political and theological differences, roman catholic world. although, never has. >> translator: the main tommic otopicon the agenda, seacial the
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russians, calling for people pay attention. unfortunately, these voice he haven't been heard. >> for some of russia's faithful this meeting is a welcome if not rather abstract event. >> i think any negotiations are good, maybe they're going the discuss some issues or solve some problems. >> we think this meeting is the best for the world and everything. peace is everything. >> reporter: the kremlin has apparently given this diplomatic trip its approval. the two men will sign a joint declaration as well as the fate of christians in the war torn middle east, political tensions between russia and the middle
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east, might be discussed too. it seems that putin views francis as less curriculum than many western leaders. russia's main catholic church, services are held in poalish armenian, spanish. >> when the leaders come together and they show their willingness to speak, to talk to each other, to overcome, suspicion towards each other, something is changing. >> as historic as this meeting is, it's not really about history, in the end, it will be judged often whether the meeting will be held today. dorsi jabari, al jazeera. >> father reese, thanks for being with us again.
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first of all, the meeting of the heads of the russian or the dom and the catholic church, why so long? >> the popes both john paul ii and be benedict, would like to t but the russian -- >> once every millenium? >> yes, well, this is a problem. i mean there was this split between catholics in the west and orthodox in the east. this has been mending since the second vatican council in the '60s and in fact the popes have met very frequently with the pate rock of constantinople. the patriarch who now resides in
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istanbul, in turkey. that has been a meeting that occurs frequently. pope paul vi was the first pope to do that. so this has been a process that's been beginning and now this is a big step forward. because the russian orthodox of course is the biggest of the orthodox churches. >> how important is this trip? other parts of latin america are seeing the number of catholics decline but not mexico, what means the buck stops in mexico? >> it is the largest spanish speaking catholic country in the world. 80% is catholic. it is the church of our lady of guadalupe whot who is the patron saint of the peoples of the
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americas. and that, our lady of guadalupe has been very important. because it showed mary, the mother of jesus, with an indian face. not a european takes. and it was a sign of the way in which christianity could adapt to the culture of the people where the gospel was planted. this was extremely important in bringing the faith to the people of the americas. >> let me ask you this question. the pope is going to be holding mass in juarez, a hotbed of drug activity, cartels and illegal immigration. how worried should catholics be, about the safety of the pope? >> the pope doesn't seem to be concerned about his safety. certainly, i wouldn't want to be on his security team. this is always a problem for any
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world leader. governments are responsible for protecting him. they take precautions, think try and take care of him. i -- they try and take care of him. frankly, i don't think the mexican cartel is going to want to kill the pope. it would bring down the rath of the entire world upon them and that would be bad for business and they're more interested in making money than making political statements. >> let's talk about political statements. do you think he's going to address the issue of illegal immigration from a catholic standpoint and is that something the clump will tak church will n on? >> the pope as been talking about refugees and immigrants from the first day of his papacy. >> remember, some are trying to stop from coming into the united states, do you think he will talk about that political hot potato? >> for the pope, people are people, whether they are
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refugees or immigrants. these are human beings. these are families. and many of them are refugees. people fleeing from the gang violence in el salvador, are just as much refugees as people fleeing from syria. they're fleeing for their lives, their lives are under threat. the pope is concerned about these people. he says we should treat them like our brothers and sisters. we need to do something to help these people and so he's going to speak out for that jaws he will speak out against gang violence, he will speak out against the drug trade, the issues of poverty and human trafficking. these are issues that are very close to the heart of the pope. >> father thomas reese joining us from washington, d.c. father, thank you so much for being with us. >> workers are trying to identify the bodies of rpg peope
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getting caught in a fire. >> fire lasted for several hours according to witnesses. topo chico is known for being overcrowded. rescue workers evacuated victims, some with burns. the governor spoke to the press. >> translator: we have ruled out the use of firearms, security was set up around the rest of the prisons in the saits. >> family members tried to break their way in. several hours later, family members were still waiting for answers. >> translator: i don't know, middle east help us! the woman director with all due respect, come out and confront us, give us the names, please, the names, that's it. where is she?
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>> reporter: in recent years deadly prison riots have become common. pope francis is set to arrive in mexico on friday. he is planning to visit a prison on the northern border city, that used to be controlled by drug cartels. adam rainey, al jazeera, mexico city. >> hundreds of people staged protests in crete. >> sophisticated missile defense system. the negotiations coming amid an ugly dispute with north korea over nuclear tests. industrial complex that was run jointly with pyongyang, all of this after the north deported all south korean workers from that same complex.
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al jazeera's harry fawcett has more from seoul. >> as of midnight south korea cut off the electricity supply to the security complex. north korea says it is turning that industrial complex that very important joint venture between north and south korea into a military zone also cutting off the military and civilian hot lines. the defense ministry in he south korea says the north may wish to turn the zone into a military base. they have so far not observed any an northern movements within the area. there is also evidence of some economic fallout in south korea at least. the business owners of the 124 south korean businesses that operatewithin the industrial complex, they say the entire responsibility of the economic
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fallout of this lies within the south korean government. the government has talked about insisting with loan repayments and making other representations to banks and other people that the companies may owe money to. the companies say that what they swanwant is full government assistance. a special law may be enacted to make sure that happened. >> that's harry fawcett report approximating.south korea saying the complex has provided $560 million of income for the north korean people. >> after the final four occupiers of the wildlife refuge, highly publicized surrender was peaceful. >> there's good that can come out of this. friends and neighbors can get
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off social media and set down over a cup of coffee and talk over their differences. we can work through these things. there's been a lot of hurt. there's been a lot of things said. but i don't think there's anything that's been done that can't be worked through. >> total of 25 people have now been charged with a felony account of conspiracy. paying for the ems response of tamir rice after the 12-year-old was shot and killed by police in a park in 2014. mayor frank johnson said the invoice for $500 should never have been sent out. >> using sting ray technology they are pushing back against critics who say they have gone too far. al jazeera's ines ferre has our
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story. >> new york city police department has been using sting rays since 2008 to spy on nearby cell phones. after documents from the freedom of information act, the nycu was used over a thousand times in a span of 7 years. it's something privacy advocates have been arguing against for years. >> basically by masquerading as selcell towers. >> without the nypd obtaining search warrants just corridors. the revelations come weeks after the aclu obtained documents, and airborne device called a dirt box. it's not clear if cell data was obtained from any tourist from disneyland. >> they can't target just my seven if they want to intercept
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my communicates. communications. rather they get about 500 people simultaneously to delve in to look at all that private content. that's what the concern is. >> reporter: police departments seem to be tight-lipped about such devices, unless they obtain a search warrant. ines ferre, al jazeera. >> and the nypd responding, that it always obtains permission. what is at riskt is the safety of new yorkers without the limited use of this technology to locate dangerous fugutives. >> crews in california have temporarily stopped a three month long methane gas leak, in the porter ranch area. they hope to permanently seal the leak in the last few days.
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thousands of families have been forced to leave the area acknowledge a story we've been reporting for months. looks like they're getting a handle on it. >> the northeast stormin storm,e go. >> here is that system, this one eventually even by the weekend will bring more snow to the plains. in the meantime, disturbance through the ohio river valley, that could bring places like north carolina two or three inches of snow, that's enough to cause problems and lake effect. what most people are talking about are the temperatures, temperatures much cooler around the great lakes, a lot cooler for the northwest. already in portions of the midwest it feels like below zero in places like fargo this morning, but this area is going to spread in the next couple of
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days. by sunday morning, midwest about a day earlier look at some of these temperatures themselves, well below zero. somewhere like albany minus 11 but we add in the wind flow.those winds are going to be picking up, shifting more down from the north, that brings in more air but with the wind chill in the next couple of days that's going to drop our feels-like temperatures by saturday well below zero but by the time we get into sunday, sunnyvale morning especially, some of these wind chills could go 30 or 40 below. this for the northeast will be the coldest air definitely of the season, some place in the last few years. >> i don't know about you del, but i wished that nicole would have been wronger. >> it's already starting to feel cooler. >> is it later that we're seeing the cold rather than in the
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past? >> our coldest part of the year tends to be in the middle of january, if you look statistically, we're still pretty close to that time of the year. >> nicole, thank you very much. every year, going to northern california for one of the largest surfing competitions in the word. >> long competition and short notice. surfers are only given 48 hours to arrive. our science and technology editor jacob ward tells us why. >> the mavericks, flying over from all over the world, to ride waves the height of a three story building. but those waves only happen a few times a year. so how do they know when the competition is on? >> all this energy -- >> this guy. mark big wave surfer and official big wave forecaster. >> this chart shows significant wave height. >> when he says the word, more than two dozen professional
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surfers from around the world, say their prayers and get on a plane. >> be able to catch waves, ride it well, compete and not die in the process. >> if you were walking at the base of this cliff, you would think this is not more than a picturesque california scene. but this el nino is going to create the circumstances, incredible amounts of water get pushed over the outcropping and produce the largest waves on earth. he looks for bik storms at sea. that's what the creates the swells necessary, to create these punishing waves. >> same effect, our pebble is a storm that covers 2,000 nautical miles, has near hurricane-force winds and all aimed directly at northern california. >> the underwater topography
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ever mavericks is what makes it all possible. the ocean is 60 feet deep just off shore but bumps into a triangular shelf. an enormous triangle that dumps more than three swimming pools of water over the shore to create the wave. the primary motivation for surfers who brave these waives is survival itself. >> you're basically as alive as you can possibly be. your heart's pounding, you're breathing hard and it's just you and the ocean. >> you need a lot more volume in the board to be able to catch the wave. >> mark is not just a weather geek. he's been on the bad end of mavericks. >> you're in the water i go and grab my board, where is my other arm? it's floating behind me i had to
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pull it over and grab onto the board. it was ugly from there. my arm was fully dislocated. >> choose a wave large enough for a contest but not make it your last. jake ward, al jazeera, california. >> although they have been chosen as alternates, the coastal commission says it may require women to be included in all future competitions. >> they admit admit they are not as strong on the huge waves as some men are. >> just like military let them in. >> straight ahead. it is a sport of speed and strategy. >> athletes with a very long competition.
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>> and kanye west's new album. 9
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al jazeera america.
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>> it's called coca, a sport with an ancient past, rooted in the yainl indian subcontinent. >> in this game, you are a runner or a chaser. allowing them to chase their opponent in the other direction. cocoa is a gaik o game of chaset requires both speed and strategy and it's more than just a bit of fun. for some young athletes like mandakani, it's a sport of priflghprivilege. >> i've come a long way, it will
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help me financially. >> and it's not just her. many of her teammates have similar stories to tell. it's taken a very long time for cocoa, to get to this sport, it was used to train soldiers on the battlefield. >> that's exactly how the coach of nepal's national team sees it. >> translator: cocoa has speed and endurance and on top of that it's a mind game too. it should become compulsory for our police force he. >> this is a cricket mad region where cocoa just doesn't have the kind of money behind it that drives big tournaments and sponsorship deals. it's hoached tha hoped that then games can change that. >> translator: then only can
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cocoa be revived. >> chr the days of league cocoa may still be a way off. but here is the spectators. that are keeping the game alive. al jazeera, northeast india. >> i did not know that. >> i did not either. it turns out albert einstein was right again a century after he predicted gravitational waves. scientists have determined those waves exist. ripples of consciousness, the device enables them to hear the universe. i've heard articles about gravitational waves multiple times yesterday and still didn't understand it. >> that's interesting, more here, martin scoreli, make one of the world's biggest rappers a
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deal. he says he will pay kanye west $10 million to prevent it from being released,. >> really interested how kanye west refers to it. basically he wants to buy the album so nobody else can listen to it? >> exactly what it is. the hunt that captivated a nation and ensnared the wrong guy. >> people loved him. teachers loved him. >> we were walking the river looking for him. i knew something was really really wrong. >> all hell broke lose. >> people were saying that we were terrorists. >> how are you providing a cover for your brother to do this? >> we saw the evil side of the social media take off.
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>> "inside story" takes you
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beyond the headlines, beyond the quick cuts, beyond the soundbites. we're giving you a deeper dive into the stories that are making our world what it is. >> ending the fighting the u.s. and russia announce a plan to pause syria's war but it won't necessarily end russian bombing. >> under pressure, american markets close on a down note, facing more struggles. >> once i'm in the white house, we'll have enough political capital to do that. >> secretary clinton, you're not in the white house yet.
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>> sanders and clinton face off for first time after the new hampshire primary. and the zika virus. >> welcome to your world this morning, i'm stephanie sy. >> and i'm del walters. , russia's foreign minister sergey lavrov. >> due to take effect in next week. the syrian government has not responded yet. i want to bring in al jazeera's jamie mcintire live at the pentagon. what are the details of the deal, is it what the u.s. wanted and does it have any teeth quch. >> if it works out it will be a significant step towards
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bringing peace to syria. the first and most urgent park is supposed to take part right away, delivering humanitarian aid to many of the besieged syrian cities where there's a real humanitarian crisis going on. people don't have access to food or medicine and a lot of those aid routes have been blocked by russian air strikes the way you have been talking about. way to get humanitarian aid to those cities. then during the course of this week they're supposed to work out a temporary cessation of hostilities. that means the russians will stop bombing syria, but not deemed to be terrorist groups by the united nations. so i.s.i.l. and the el nusra front will still be legitimate targets. how do they determine what is
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the legitimate targets? this will not stop the campaign against i.s.i.l, and by the way, will not affect the u.s. air campaign, against i.s.i.l. targets in syria as well, that could continue but as you could see it would be kind of complicated, you have to gig out which group is which on the ground. that's attempted to be determined this week if it's not derailed. that cessation of hostilities would go in about a week and that's supposed to lay the groundwork for a more lasting ceasefire. stephanie. >> they have been striking aleppo, and russia has not always agreed with the u.s. on which groups it considers terrorists. in this deal jamie are they saying they agree with the u.s., they are only going to be striking at i.s.i.l. and el
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nusra? >> that's been the rub all along. russia says they are fighting terrorists and i.s.i.l, but the u.s. says the majority of the strikes have not been against i.s.i.l. or terrorists. they feel comfortable sort of freezing the battlefield where it is now now that much more of this territory is back in the hands of assad while they negotiate. and of course, what a lot of people, outside observers are saying when they look at this is russia once again has essentially outmaneuvered the united states and its allies and put assad back in a position of power. >> jamie mcintire reporting from the pentagon, thank you. >> fleeing fighting in aleppo that you talked about this according to the red cross, 500
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people have been killed since the syrian government began its offensive on january 1st. zeina khodr is in aleppo area with the latest. >> reporter: the offensive has displaced 50,000 people according to the united nations. many are living outside an can nod survive without aid. they are welcoming any deal that would bring in aid supplies to besieged areas across the country. according to the u.n, half a million live in besieged areas. but at the same time, they don't believe this deal will really take effect on the ground because they point to the fact that over the past five years these ceasefire have been agreed upon but never really implemented on the ground. they believe that the objective really has been to change the balance of power on the ground, to put pressure on the rebels in
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order for them to surrender. they believe that the government's policy of depopulating areas as well as laying siege to areas is to bring about a surrender. so for them, the government is more concerned with imposing its solution to the conflict and not compromising. now, air strikes are continuing on the ground, the northern homs country side has been a battle ground for months. but now the government has managed to severe the supply routes into that area. the united nations is warning up to 120,000 people face the risk of starvation, face the risk of disease because the u.n. can't enter. we still do not hear from the armed groups on the ground on their position whether or not they are going to abide by this. at the end of the day, a pause in the fighting means a freeze on the front lines. and a freeze really that the government and its backers are holding on to the strategic gains they have made over the
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past few weeks. >> that is our zeina khodr in turkey. some of the supply routes for delivering that aid also cut off. >> nato is now sending war ships to the eastern mediterranean. greece, italy and turkey have asked or the aid. over a million arrived in greece from turkey, mostly from syria. dow finished lower, other asian stocks lower. fed chair janet yellen says what's happening overseas does have an effect on markets. yellen says the central bank is
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watching global markets carefully but still thinks the fed will gradually increase interest rates this year. >> both hillary clinton and bernie sanders attending a democratic fun debate. >> senator bernie sanders and form he secretary of state hillary clinton debated this time in milwaukee and this time for the first time since the results from new hampshire came dmm results that had bernie sanders winning by more than 20 points. these debates have been previously festivals of disagreement but this time, there was little more. >> the family would pay $500 more in taxes and get a reduction in their health care cost of $5,000. in my view, health care is a right of all people, not a privilege. and i will fight for that.
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>> we both share the goal of universal health care coverage. before it was called obamacare, it was called hillary care. >> at times it was contentious. >> once i'm in the white house we'll have enough political capital to do that. >> secretary clinton, you're not in the white house yet. >> perhaps trying to strengthen his candidacy in an area he has less experience than his opponent. >> she talked about getting the approval or the support or the mentoring ever henry kissinger. i happen to believe that henry kissinger was one of the most destructive secretaries of state in this country. there i know journalists ask who you do support on foreign policy and we have yet to know who that
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is. >> owner moderator judy woodruff. >> judy, i have spent my entire adult life work towards making sure that women are empowered to make their own choices, even if that choice is not to vote for me. >> look, we are fighting for every vote that we can get. >> president obama loomed over the debate as clinton aligned herself with the obama legacy throughout. [applause] >> the kind of criticism that we've heard from senator sanders from our president, i expect from republicans. not for someone running for the democratic nomination for president. >> madam secretary, that is a low below. >> a rare moment of caustic exchange as the democratic exchange may be taking on a more
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frequent tone. michael shure, al jazeera, milwaukee, wisconsin. >> releases are just in time for the caucuses in nevada and the south carolina primary. >> and on the republican side, ted cruz's campaign denying any knowledge of controversial row bow calls. the calls become hostile when they are supporting anyone other than cruz. donald trump is criticizing the cruz campaign. >> former president george w. bush will hit the campaign trail in support of his brother. the 43 rtd president.rd.
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president. >> jeb bush is trying to jump start his campaign in south carolina. >> i'm sure it will turn out all right. [applause] >> reporter: the welcome was warm at a question-and-answer session in florence. lending a helping hand, the state senior united states senator, lindsay graham who dropped out of the primary and endorsed bush. >> my hope for jeb is that we will do very well here. the bushes are highly respected. we're going to turn this into a referendum of the commander in chief. >> i like him because he's a conservative man. he's a christian and he loves america. >> after the event, the form he governor took a few questions. governor bush what is it going to take to turn it around for you? >> we've made good progress in new hampshire and i'm working here. we're going to work more. that's the only thing i can do.
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i can control the things i can control, i can't control the things i can't. sounds simple. that's how politics works. >> donald trump held a rally calling voters to turn their backs on all opponents. >> all of these characters are going to give it up. >> reporter: the other republican candidates senator marco rubio, governor john kasich and ted cruz are als all crisscrossing south carolina. >> the only candidate who can beat donald trump is me. >> hoping the south carolina primary will slow him down enough for them to stay mountain race. randall pinkston, al jazeera, columbia, south carolina. >> a new york city police officer facing 15 years in prison after killing an unarmed man. peter leang was found guilty of
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manslaughter, he said he was startled and fired a shot. his lawyers will appeal. >> they added an intentional aspect to the crime which was uncharged. so i mean, clearly, that could give us a very good ground for appeal. >> there are no winners here. but justice was done. and we want to make it clear that this conviction in no way is a conviction of the new york city police department which is the finest apolice department in the world. >> leang was dismissed from the force right after the verdict was announced. >> a deep freeze is taking hold over a large chunk in the u.s. let's bring in nicole mitchell for more of the bad news. >> of our team i'm maybe the hardiest in the cold weather.
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>> you're from minnesota. >> when i come in in a full length parka, everyone is concerned. keep all the warm stuff handy. we have already had temperatures that have gone anywhere from single digits in minnesota to the 20s in the northeast but the wind is starting to pick up once again. that's going to be one of our big problems and already making it feel like subzero in somewhere like fargo and tomorrow is going to be that coldest morning with this shot of air. once we get through the next couple of days it's going to be sunday morning in the northeast and we still because of that wind flow have some significant areas of lake effect snow. so if you're under one of those bans, another six inches to a foot, not out of the question, the next couple of days with this and another disturbing southward, south carolina, if you get two or three inches that's enough to cause problems. i mentioned sunday morning for the northeast. zero in new york city, minus 12
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once we get towards montreal. that northern tier with the wind, could go to 40 below feels like, further southward, 20 or 30 below is the wind chill factor. it is definitely going to be brutal. those winds will already start kick up in this region saturday. we start feeling subzero on saturday already even though that coldest air is really going to be on sunday. the whole weekend is going to be a cold one. >> i won't be leaving the building to tell you the treuft. i'll justruth. i'll just stay here. >> anger for people in greece. and left in limbo in ukraine. the challenges for the orphans of the war.
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>> well, already this morning there are doubts about that us u.s. russian deal to stop the fighting in syria. >> russian prime minister dimitri medvedev. >> the message from dimitri medvedev, and the whole russian hirhierarchy, and it's allies, saudi arabia mainly, stay out. do not interfere in what is going on on the ground in syria, any more than as the russians
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see it, they are already doing, the u.s. and regional allies are backing different opposition groups inside imrrp syria. the message is, they say unless the syrian government, the legitimate government as they put it are actively asking for the contribution of ground troops in saudi arabia then any incursion would be illegal. we do understand that in the coming hours, there will be a meeting in munich between sergey lavrov and the saudi arabian minister, where they are going to discuss the task force, the cessation of hostilities and what saudi arabia is hypotheticalling they will be prepared to do, send ground
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troops into syria. >> gagalbraith says, even though there are problems with the agreement, anything is better. >> even a temporary end, one has to have hope. so i really commend foreign minister lavrov and secretary kerry for having come up with this. the sponsors, the various outsiders, will in fact implement the ceasefire. the outsiders have a lot of leverage. so i think there is some reason to hope. but it really doesn't depend on russia or the united states or turkey or iran. it's going to depend on the syrian government and the various rebel groups that have been fighting it. i think president obama and
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secretary kerry have handled this in a very careful and shrewd way. providing significant numbers of weapons or support is prolonging the conflict. many of the people who are opposed of islamists so the end result may be as bad as this thought is, might be worse. and so the only solution is going to be put the emphasis on peace talks and that's exactly what secretary kerry has done. >> ambassador galbraith says the action he in the weeks ahead by syria will have a big decision on whether the action succeeds. >> agriculture ministry in athens police tried to use tear gas but were not successful. they are trying to deal with that country's massive budget deficit. an agreement signed one year ago was supposed to end the fighting in ukraine but both
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sides still accuse each other of breaking that ceasefire each and every day. charles stratford reports. >> these children used to live in an orphanage now they live in a war zone. two with severe learning disabilities, they live with their adoptive parents in the gray zone between pro-russian separatists and the ukrainian army. despite repeated calls for a ceasefire, the fighting continues, especially at night. >> nadia cries and screams at night. we try to keep the girls strong. we try to show them that we are not afraid. >> the agreement signed in the
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belarusian capital of mingts, m, both side accuse the other of violating that agreement. the two towers on the horizon are about two and a half kilometers away and they say the separatists just those towers as lookout positions. they have moved 78-year-old grandmother sonia to safety twice since the fighting started. she has come under fire every time and every house comes under fire. >> my children were born here. my grandchildren were born here. everyone is gone, i don't want
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to go, because if i do how will they find me? i won't move until there is peace. >> translator: the conflct hasn'conflict isfrozen. we have to be here to protect and help the people who decided to stay, and to bring an end to this conflict. >> at a nearby checkpoint a ukrainian cossack. >> it's important because people are strong in their unity when we are united ant together we will defeat our enemy and the evil muskovites. >> people have no talk of victory, wishing the fighting would end. charles stratford, al jazeera,
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eastern ukraine. >> this long after in crimea and ukraine they are still fighting and hunkered back. when we come back, stopping zika with a vaccine. >> dr. celine gander is here. >> the meeting between the pope and the head of the russian orthodox church. fp
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>> people loved him. teachers loved him. >> we were walking the river looking for him. i knew something was really really wrong. >> all hell broke lose.
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>> people were saying that we were terrorists. >> how are you providing a cover for your brother to do this? >> we saw the evil side of the social media take off. >> welcome back to your worldth. just about 8:30 eastern time. time to take a look at the top stories. moscow says it won't stop bombing the terrorists in syria, that's what it's calling it, even with a attentiv tentative . >> nikkei tanked and sent other stocks lower. >> hillary clinton and bernie sanders clashed at their debate last night in milwaukee. clinton going after sanders
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saying he hasn't disclosed how he is going to pay for his health care reforms, sanders attacking clinton on her actions in iraq and yrs. al jazeera's john henry smith has more on the zika virus. >> reporter: there have only been a few dozen cases of zika diagnosed in the u.s. but there are worries those numbers could climb in the spring and summer. >> we have the first laboratory documented case of travel-related zika in a marylander. >> we are receiving about 30 calls a day from ob-gyn doctors. >> the centers for disease control as had said it has identified 20 zika virus cases since 2015, most cases contracted overseas. however the cdc says nine of ten cases identified in the u.s.
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virgin islands and puerto rico were acquired locally. cdc director tom freeden says americans should take heed especially expectant mothers. >> travel advice, not to travel if you are regular than the. we will likely see intapt cases in puerto rico and other u.s. territories where there may be intensive spread of zika. >> the cdc says because most people infected with zika don't present symptoms, no special screenings. president obama has asked congress for $1.8 billion to fight the virus. there appears to be support on both sides of the aisle to honor that request. >> we are getting prepared but we are anticipating bipartisan support on this. >> portion of that would go to the cdc. at least $600 million would go to the hardest hit areas like
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preek. the world health organization says two zika vaccine candidates appear promising but at least 18 months away from large scale trials. john henry smith, al jazeera. >> talking more about the u.s. response to zika. when you look at how the money that may be allocated to zika will be spent, is itin it goingn the right place? will it help prevent the spread here? >> almost all of that money is going to the centers for disease control and prevention. are those mosquitos infected will zika virus, the cdc will be developing more dc diagnostic ts for the virus.
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the u.s. agency for international development, they are going to be helping control mosquitos in latin america as well as cdc's in the united states. puerto rico is the one part of the u.s. where we are concerned about pregnant women getting zika virus. >> there seems to be growing concern in this country as you hear the language coming out of the w.h.o, the possibility of millions of cases spreading, we have 52 cases here in the united states. we don't know in how many of those instances we are talking about pregnant women, in my opinion, zika virus for the average woman is not such a big deal. >> that's a point stephanie, for the average person, zika is not a big deal. for men, if they are trying to get their spouse or partner pregnant, unless you are trying get pregnant zika virus is not really a concern. >> what about these links between zika and other potential
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neurological disease? how tight are those connections? >> extremely rarely, you are talking about a fraction of a percent of cases would be a risk for guillain-barre syndrome. guillain-barre has been associated with a whole host of viruses, even influenza. it is a progressive paralysis that moves its way up into the chest. this is a general temporary kind of paralysis that people even then get over. >> i don't want to underplay the microcephaly part of this. there have been strong links between the two. the microcephaly is a severe form of microcephaly right? >> i think that's an important point to make. someful congressmen on hill have been saying, some are doing fine
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with microcephaly. this is really quite severe in terms of the cognitive effects as well as the health effects. >> in general, we talk about the virus, couple of deaths that have been linked to zika although there's not a causal link. do we know whether there's a mortal threat of zika? >> some kids who have died soon after birth, and miscarriage related to zika, or the very, very rare complication of guillain-barre. in the united states we are more protected from that, not the whole host of reasons. >> do you think we're going to have a vaccine in the next 18 months? >> i think that's extremely optimistic. we may have something tested in
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humans very different from something we could use to scale to droll epidemic. >> dr. sanders, thank you for your expertise. del. >> nine more people from six states have been charged in connection with that armed occupation with that oregon wildlife refuge. seven arrested so far. all of this happening after the final four occupiers surrendered on thursday. one of the occupiers was killed last month, and the thursday highly publicized surrender was peaceful. >> there is good that can come out of this. they can get off social media and sit down over a cup of coffee and work through these differences. there's been a lot of hurt, a lot of things said. but i don't think there's anything that has been done that can't be worked through. >> a total of 25 people have now been charged with a floin felont
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of interference with federal workers. tamir rice, shot and killed in 2014, a billing for $500 for emergency help should never have been sent out. officials at southern california gas said they plugged the leaking methane gas well in porter ranch. thousands have been forced to leave the area. >> this is not what you want to layer. more snow on the way for parts of the country even as you walk out the door and freeze to death. >> that's why the big parka came out today. a couple of areas that are dealing with this, around the great lakes, that lake effect snow ends.
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but some places can get from six inches to another foot, very localized. a little bit more widespread, this disturbance south of the ohio river valley, a couple of inches in north carolina is enough to cause a problem. then into the pacific northwest, we've had that moist flow, you can see some breaks in this flow and recently it's kind of gone up over a ridge some of that moisture. now it's going to finally be moving a lbility. little bit. plus an enhancement from a clipper coming through. that moves out. this current round of west coast weather, already by this weekend it timely does pull through and we are going to see chances for snow, through the midwest, saturday into sunday, we could watch that while we watch another system starting to impact the west coast.
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especially somewhere like the midwest, you are starting off below zero this morning, wind chills very, very chilly, that is probably not particularly appreciated. urs in the meantime, it is the western -- temperatures in the meantime, it is the western side of the country that's been in miementd aremild territory. >> but pets outside this is the dangerous cold in parts of the northeast. nick nicole mitchell, thank you. leaders of the two top religions in the world, pope francis will meet with the head of the russian orthodox church. >> split for a millennia. as dorsi jabarra reports. >> reporter: the sights and sounds of a russian orthodox
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service in the great schism of 1054 acknowledge political and theological differences plit spt christianity into what is now the russian orthodox and conflict church. >> the main topic on the agenda is going to be defending christians in the middle east who have been destroyed. there have been loud voices from the catholic church and the orthodox world especially the russians calling for people to pay attention. unfortunately these voices haven't been heard. >> reporter: for some of russia's faithful the meeting is a welcome if not abstract event. >> translator: i think any negotiations are good. maybe they're going to discuss some issues or solve some problems. >> translator: we hope this meeting will be useful for people for world for everything. peace is the most important thing. >> reporter: though president putin wasn't among the priests
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waving patriarch offer on thursday, the kremlin has apparently given this diplomatic trip its approval. the two men will sign a joint declaration as well as the fate of christians in the war torn middle east, political tensions between russia and the west may well be discussed too. after two recent meetings it seems putin views the algerian argentinian francis. >> when leaders come together and they show their willingness to speak, to talk to each other, to overcome hostility, i don't know if it's hostility but suspicion towards each other, something is changing. >> reporter: as historic as
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this meeting is, it's not about history. in the end it will be judged on whether the meeting can in any way help with the problems of today. dorsa jabari, al jazeera. pope benedict and john paul ii both tried to pleat, but tension is were too strong at the time. >> there was a split between catholics in the west and the russian orthodox in the east. in the 1960s, popes have met very frequently with the patriarch of constantinople, that has been a meeting that occurs frequently.
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pope paul vi was the first pope to do this. this is a step that, the russian orthodox is the bigs of the orthodox churches. >> let's talk about the visit to mexico. how important is this trip? other parts of latin america are seeing their numbers decline but not mexico. i guess the buck stops in mexico. >> this is very important for the pope. it is the largest spanish speaking catholic country in the world. 81% of mexico is catholic. >> and pope francis also expected to make a stop in juarez during his trip to mexico, the border city notorious for drug crimes, in 2010 it was considered to be the murder capital of the world. when we come back, wrongly accused of the boston marathon bombings. >> one man at the forefront in a search for a suspect.
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>> one of the most disliked men in america, why martin coreli is looking to deal with kanye west.
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>> in april of 2013, the nation was gripped by the search for the suspects in the boston bombing. the internet picked up the search. >> a new documentary tries to tell the whole story.
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>> more television crews are showing up. the associated press showed up. there was a couple of other international media types that showed up. i can't totally remember what the sign said but it was something like, war is not the answer. it's over the front door of the house. and you're thinking maybe this guy is the boston bomber but you don't know. knocked a couple of times, no answer. and they're looking at twitter and they're looking at facebook and they're trying to figure out is it him, does it look like him, do we think it's him? where was the family, where is he? >> there was no search warrant, there was a "war is not the answer" sign on the front door. a lot of tv trucks. >> baseon reddit, twitter and facebook. >> the fbi gave us a little earlier, his name is sunil
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trepathy, he's been missing for two weeks, his family is trying the get information on where he is. >> it kept barreling down the tracks and information got faster and faster. >> i had over 58 missed calls and voice mails between 3:00 a.m. and 4:00 a.m. >> i'm sorry to bother you at this time, i wouldn't, if i thought it wasn't urgent. >> watching the calls and area codes. it was literally network after twornetwork after network. >> neil brothman, thank you for joining us. this was a social media nightmare and yet it happened. as one person pointing out the train cepg rolling dow kept role
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tracks. how did this happen? >> thank you for having me. the marathon was bombed on monday the 15th. after the bombing happened, almost immediately in social media, places like reddit there was crowd searching and churning going on in social media to try examine travis and stills and security camera footage around the player on this t the marathd been going on for a couple of days. on thursday the fbi held a press conference where they released photographs of suspect 1 and suspect 2. so running parallel to this we have sunil trepathi who had been missing for two weeks and his family was looking for him.
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this came together, where authorities were looking for help and they showed unidentified travis. >> something this big, simply saying, "we got this wrong," does that suffice? >> well, it depends on who we're talking about whether we say, we got it wrong. in social media, many, many people who were participating in this -- in the accusations against sunil were operating under pseudonyms, anonymous names. we don't know who those people were. >> that's my point. when a broadcast organization duets it wrong we get sued. but in these days of social media it seems anybody can broadcast whatever they want. >> that's true. that is one of the democratickizing things about the internet. being sued for getting things
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wrong, all we have to do is look at what happened when it jumped the barrier from social media into mainstream media. so we have reporters like luke russert from nbc, he was sending out the false information and retweeting it. we have dylan buyers doing the same thing, andrew kazinski from buzzfeed. it was getting out through the mainstream journalists who had no accountability, and there has been no accountability since then. >> did this feed into a narrative that i geese many might have wanted to happen? i say that because people say it can't happen again. i want to read you this quote. seldom have so many people been so wrong so completely, the assumption that the bombing was the work of muslim extremists.
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it was in response to a middle eastern man following oklahoma city bombings two decades ago, was sunil trip rankthy the villain that america wanted to find? >> i don't think he was the villain america wanted to find. i think he was the perceived and misidentified villain that people with a lot of time on their hands were trying to find. i think that the people in the united states were hoping to find the correct person. you know, sunil had -- it was a terrible confluence of events that came together. you know i think people in social media were -- you know they were playing off of each other. and it happens all the time. it continues to happen. i think that people as they consume media, especially
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journalists, we should be very careful how we're sourcing our information and suspend our disbelief a little bit before we start sending this information out for others. >> that's why they tell journalists all the time in j-school, the facts first. thanks for being with us. we invite you to watch the documentary, happens this sunday on al jazeera america. >> it happens all the time on media not just social media. >> when we come back, getting ready for a special contest in surfing. >> where you only get 48 hours' notice.
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>> our american story is written everyday. it's not always pretty, but it's real... and we show you like no-one
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else can. this is our american story. this is america tonight. >> every year, the top surfers in the world head to northern california for one of the biggest surfing competitions. the eefngh event is a combinatif long anticipation and short readiness. jake ward jake ward tells uour y editor jacob ward tells us why. >> surfers flying in from all over the world to ride waves the height of a three story building. how do they know when the competition is on? this guy, mark sponsler, big wave surfer and official forecaster. when he says the word, big wave
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surfers say their prayers and get on a plane. >> be able to compete and not die in the process. >> if you were walking at the base of this cliff you might not think this beach is anything other than a picturesque california scene. but under the right circumstances and this el nino year is going to create those circumstances. producing the largest waves on earth. >> like a bulldozer just goes and scoops the ocean up and just pushes it towards our coast. >> sponsler looks for big waves at sea, that's what creates these punishing wreafers. punishing waves. >> throwing a pebble into a pond. creating this storm, near hurricane force winds aimed directly at northern california. >> the underwater topography of
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mavericks is what makes this possible. the ocean is 60 feet deep here but then bumps into a ridge that brings the depth to 15 feet. an apex, an enormous triangle, creating a surfing competition where the question of style kind of goes out the window. the primary motivation for servers who brave these waves is survival itself. >> you're basically as alive as you can possibly be. your heart's pounding, you're breathing hard and it's just you in the ocean. >> you need a lot more volume in the board to be able to catch the wave. >> mark is not just a weather geek. he's been on the bad end of mavericks. >> you're in the water i go ato grab my board and i go, where is my other arm? it's floating back behind me.
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i had to pull it over and grab onto the board. it was ugly from there. my arm was fully dislocated. >> for him, predicting these waves is as big as riding them. not so large that anyone's ride would be their last. jacob ward, al jazeera, california. >> former martin scoreli, asking kanye west if can he buy his new album, the life of pablo. he says he'll pay west $6 million to prevent it from being released. west debuted the album on thursday in a fashion show. >> i'm stephanie sy. >> i'm del walters. we invite you to have a great day and a great weekend. >> stay warm. >> good luck with that!
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hours after word powers reach a breakthrough on syria, russian planes reportedly kill 18 people in homs. you're watching al jazeera live from our headquarters in doha. also ahead in the next 30 minutes: tension in athens as greek farmers angry about austerity try to storm a ministry building. in egypt, thousands of doctors protest the release of police officers accused of attacking their colleagues. we

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